#1 The United States of SWAT? by algernonpj 18.04.2014 14:06

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April 18, 2014 4:00 AM
The United States of SWAT?
Military-style units from government agencies are wreaking havoc on non-violent citizens.
By John Fund



Regardless of how people feel about Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy’s standoff with the federal Bureau of Land Management over his cattle’s grazing rights, a lot of Americans were surprised to see TV images of an armed-to-the-teeth paramilitary wing of the BLM deployed around Bundy’s ranch.

They shouldn’t have been. Dozens of federal agencies now have Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams to further an expanding definition of their missions. It’s not controversial that the Secret Service and the Bureau of Prisons have them. But what about the Department of Agriculture, the Railroad Retirement Board, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Office of Personnel Management, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? All of these have their own SWAT units and are part of a worrying trend towards the militarization of federal agencies — not to mention local police forces.

“Law-enforcement agencies across the U.S., at every level of government, have been blurring the line between police officer and soldier,” journalist Radley Balko writes in his 2013 book Rise of the Warrior Cop. “The war on drugs and, more recently, post-9/11 antiterrorism efforts have created a new figure on the U.S. scene: the warrior cop — armed to the teeth, ready to deal harshly with targeted wrongdoers, and a growing threat to familiar American liberties.”

The proliferation of paramilitary federal SWAT teams inevitably brings abuses that have nothing to do with either drugs or terrorism. Many of the raids they conduct are against harmless, often innocent, Americans who typically are accused of non-violent civil or administrative violations.

Take the case of Kenneth Wright of Stockton, Calif., who was “visited” by a SWAT team from the U.S. Department of Education in June 2011. Agents battered down the door of his home at 6 a.m., dragged him outside in his boxer shorts, and handcuffed him as they put his three children (ages 3, 7, and 11) in a police car for two hours while they searched his home. The raid was allegedly intended to uncover information on Wright’s estranged wife, Michelle, who hadn’t been living with him and was suspected of college financial-aid fraud.

The year before the raid on Wright, a SWAT team from the Food and Drug Administration raided the farm of Dan Allgyer of Lancaster, Pa. His crime was shipping unpasteurized milk across state lines to a cooperative of young women with children in Washington, D.C., called Grass Fed on the Hill. Raw milk can be sold in Pennsylvania, but it is illegal to transport it across state lines. The raid forced Allgyer to close down his business.

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http://www.nationalreview.com/article/37...-swat-john-fund

#2 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Frank Cannon 18.04.2014 14:23

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My question with these raids is always where the hell is the states govt' on these things? Govs and state congressmen should be all over this to defend their citizens. It took a massive show of force from the freedom fighters at Bundy's ranch to get Sandoval off his lazy ass.

The states are the last line of defense against this Federal brutality.

#3 RE: The United States of SWAT? by algernonpj 18.04.2014 15:19

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Quote: Frank Cannon wrote in post #2
My question with these raids is always where the hell is the states govt' on these things? Govs and state congressmen should be all over this to defend their citizens. It took a massive show of force from the freedom fighters at Bundy's ranch to get Sandoval off his lazy ass.

The states are the last line of defense against this Federal brutality.

Frank,

That is an excellent question.

I suspect everyone hopes these abuses will be flushed down the memory hole.

The fact that states are the last line of defense is why Reid and his buds mock Bundy who states his is a citizen of the sovereign state of Nevada as well as a citizen of the US.

I perceive an interesting phenomenon.

An economy has been created in which:
  • on an individual level sovereignty is being erased as more an more individuals are dependent upon the central government for basic needs

  • on a state level sovereignty is being erased as more and more states are dependent upon central government handouts to meet the freebie requirements mandated by the central government

  • on a country level sovereignty is being erased as borders are rendered meaningless and law is being changed to comply with global standards


  • On a side note, her is an example of the power of the governor to put a dent in federal over reach:
    The reason the rustled Bundy cattle were still at the compound and could be rescued is that the Utah governor refused to allow the rustled cattle over the state line.

    Zitat
    "As Governor of Utah, I urgently request that a herd of cattle seized by the Bureau of Land Management from Mr. Cliven Bundy of Bunkerville, Nevada, not be sent to Utah. There are serious concerns about human safety and animal health and well-being, if these animals are shipped to and sold in Utah."
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/04/...ranch-standoff/

    #4 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Cincinnatus 18.04.2014 15:50

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    This was in the local news recently.

    Walla Walla police get new armored vehicle



    The Walla Walla Police Department has received a new Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Armored Vehicle from the Department of Defense. The vehicle will be used by the Emergency Services Unit SWAT Team during training exercises and high risk operations.

    The MRAP gives the Team a level of protection previously unavailable, providing full armor to enhance the safety of members as they are delivered directly to the scene of volatile situations involving potentially armed suspects. It will also allow for the safe evacuation of citizens from a scene in the event of an active shooter incident.

    The cost of the MRAP to the City was $6,900, to cover the cost of transporting the vehicle to Walla Walla from Texas. The sales price to the US Army was $733,000.


    http://www.keprtv.com/news/local/Walla-W...-255358071.html

    Walla Walla is a pleasant (really!) little town of about 30k-40k souls in eastern WA. Why they need an armored vehicle over there I have not idea, but it should be pointed out the WA state prison with some pretty hard cases is over there.

    In July 2011, USA Today selected Walla Walla as the friendliest small town in the United States.[9] Walla Walla was also named Friendliest Small Town in America the same year as part of Rand McNally's annual Best of the Road contest.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walla_Walla,_Washington

    #5 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Cincinnatus 18.04.2014 15:55

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    I ask gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging

    Patrick Henry in his famous "Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death" speech, March 23, 1775.

    http://libertyonline.hypermall.com/henry-liberty.html

    #6 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Frank Cannon 18.04.2014 17:19

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    Quote: Cincinnatus wrote in post #4
    Why they need an armored vehicle over there I have not idea....


    Yeah you do. Because all of these dept have budgets to do whatever they want with. Now they have this stupid toy that they have no idea what to do with. It will sit on the lot till the next budget crisis or it breaks and they figure out it will cost $250K to fix it and it be sold to the highest bidder at the police auction.

    If this happened in my town, we would be storming the next supervisor meeting not because they wanted this paramilitary machine but because they pissed $7K away to do it.

    #7 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Cincinnatus 19.04.2014 01:10

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    Congratulations! Your tiny town has an MRAP and is ready for war

    Here at The Watch, we’re looking for the smallest town in America to acquire an MRAP, or Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected armored personnel vehicle.

    For the past few years, the Pentagon has been giving these vehicles to police departments across the country. The unwieldy behemoths have little real application in domestic police work. They’re designed for use on a battlefield. (The Pentagon offers no training to police departments when it gives the vehicles away. And they’ve been known to tip over.)

    But police departments are snatching them up. It’s part of the general trend toward more militarized domestic police forces that’s been happening since about the early 1980s.

    Below, I’ve assembled a quick (but by no means comprehensive) rundown of towns and counties to have recently required an MRAP from the Defense Department. But we want to find the tiniest town in America whose police force will be protected from any potential insurgent uprising. So far, the leading contender is Dundee, Mich., a sprawling metropolis of 3,900 people. If you hear of a town with fewer people acquiring an MRAP, please let me know.

    Towns and counties that have recently acquired an MRAP:
    •Lyon County, Nev. (population: 51,000)
    •Watertown, Conn. (population 22,000)
    •Walla Walla, Wash. (population: 32,000)
    •Michigan City, Ind. (population: 31,000)
    •Mason City, Iowa (population: 28,000)
    •Madison, Ind. (population 12,000)
    •Willimantic, Conn. (population: 18,000)
    •Cape Girardeau, Mo. (population: 39,000)
    •Story County, Iowa (population: 91,000)
    •Manteca, Calif. (population: 71,000)
    •Jasper County, Iowa (population: 36,000)
    •Justice, Ill. (population: 13,000)
    •Dodge County, Wis. (population: 88,000)
    •Roanoke Rapids, N.C. (population: 16,000)
    •Nampa, Idaho (population: 83,900)
    •Merrillville, Ind. (population: 35,600)
    •St. Cloud, Minn. (population: 66,000)
    •Warren County, N.Y. (population: 65,500)
    •North Augusta, S.C. (population: 22,000)
    •Eureka, Calif. (population 27,000)


    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-w...-ready-for-war/

    #8 RE: The United States of SWAT? by ThirstyMan 19.04.2014 01:14

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    BEWARE! the domestic army cometh

    #9 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Frank Cannon 19.04.2014 01:16

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    Here is a question for everyone. What does the DOD do with all these $7000 for shipping fees? Is there a slush fund being set up? There is a hell of a lot of decommissioned equipment laying around after these wars. Could add up to a healthy off the books account.

    #10 RE: The United States of SWAT? by Rev 20.04.2014 04:56

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    Quote: ThirstyMan wrote in post #8
    BEWARE! the domestic army cometh


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