#1 Sen. Tim Scott wasn’t invited to event commemorating MLK march on Washington by ThirstyMan 29.08.2013 05:08

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Sen. Tim Scott, R.-S.C., the only African American serving in the United States Senate, wasn't invited to the event commemorating the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's march on Washington, though a host of Democratic luminaries spoke on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

“Senator Scott was not invited to speak at the event,” Greg Blair, a spokesman for the South Carolina lawmaker, said in a statement to the Washington Examiner. “The senator believes today is a day to remember the extraordinary accomplishments and sacrifices of Dr. King, Congressman John Lewis, and an entire generation of black leaders. Today’s anniversary should simply serve as an opportunity to reflect upon how their actions moved our country forward in a remarkable way.”


President Obama was the keynote speaker of the event, of course, which is held in honor of the achievements of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. Wouldn't it have made sense to have the first black president joined by the first black senator from South Carolina, which was a Jim Crow state when the original march on Washington took place?
The Washington Examiner contacted MLK Dream 50 to ask why Scott wasn’t invited, but didn’t hear back in time for publication.

http://washingtonexaminer.com/sen.-tim-s...article/2534830

#2 RE: Sen. Tim Scott wasn’t invited to event commemorating MLK march on Washington by ThirstyMan 29.08.2013 05:17

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"Wouldn't it have made sense to have the first black president joined by the first black senator from South Carolina, which was a Jim Crow state when the original march on Washington took place?"

Yes, that was the dream of Dr. King, that people of all stripes and color, would come together as one. He wasn't a racist or a bigot, he cast a vision of the way things should be in a positive, godly way. Sinister forces don't see what he saw and want to hijack his fame to promote their agenda. Sadly, where's the articulate spokesperson today for the original Dream?

That's the shame.

#3 RE: Sen. Tim Scott wasn’t invited to event commemorating MLK march on Washington by Cincinnatus 29.08.2013 15:04

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Yes, the exclusion of Tim Scott does seem to be a form of segregation based on politics, but one must admit Obama has an unquestionable right to have been there. Who can ever forget his resounding words regarding his parents: “There was something stirring across the country because of what happened in Selma, Ala., because some folks are willing to march across a bridge. So they got together and Barack Obama Jr. was born,”

Now some might quibble about that given that Obama was born in 1961 (we think) and the Selma was in 1965, but that's just racist talk. It's the thought that counts.

#4 RE: Sen. Tim Scott wasn’t invited to event commemorating MLK march on Washington by ThirstyMan 29.08.2013 21:08

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Quote: Cincinnatus wrote in post #3
Yes, the exclusion of Tim Scott does seem to be a form of segregation based on politics, but one must admit Obama has an unquestionable right to have been there. Who can ever forget his resounding words regarding his parents: “There was something stirring across the country because of what happened in Selma, Ala., because some folks are willing to march across a bridge. So they got together and Barack Obama Jr. was born,”

Now some might quibble about that given that Obama was born in 1961 (we think) and the Selma was in 1965, but that's just racist talk. It's the thought that counts.


A couple of thoughts.

Since his timeline of these Civil Rights marches is substantially off it really could mean that he didn't know when those events occurred.

His use of imagery with his parents being romantic while present at the Selma bridge in '65 makes a great story. If this story were true it would make him a mixed breed child of the Civil Rights movement. How cool would that have been? ...if only it were true. He couldn't pass up the opportunity to link himself into the MLK story, even though he is one who appears to have never suffered for being black.

Quite the contrary. He seems to have been exceptionally skillful at positioning himself everywhere in this role of an underprivileged black person that in the present climate, all doors opened up too easily for him.

So this "story" has worked for him all throughout his life. Too bad for him that Selma fabrication wasn't really true.

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